Fidest – Agenzia giornalistica/press agency

Quotidiano di informazione – Anno 31 n° 229

Posts Tagged ‘cardiac imaging’

Cardiac imaging experts create ‘imaging phenotype’ to improve personalised treatment

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 6 novembre 2017

lisbonaLisbon, Portugal 6 to 9 December 2017 at the Centro de Congressos de Lisboa (CCL). EuroEcho-Imaging is the annual meeting of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The full scientific programme is available here. The EuroEcho-Imaging 2017 mobile app can be downloaded from the App Store or Google play – search for ‘EuroEcho2017’.
“Clinicians, scientists and engineers from across the globe attend EuroEcho-Imaging,” said Professor Erwan Donal, Chairperson of the Scientific Programme Committee. “It is the place to see the most innovative imaging techniques in cardiovascular diseases and journalists will find plenty of fresh material.” Phenomapping is an emerging field that will be discussed by specialists at the meeting. Using the statistical methods that condense large amounts of data from DNA sequences into understandable information, data from cardiac imaging (mainly echocardiography) is transformed into an ‘imaging phenotype’. Professor Donal said: “This is a completely new area in cardiovascular imaging. International leaders will reveal how phenomapping can be used to personalise treatment for patients with cardiovascular disease.” EuroEcho-Imaging is the place to be to meet world renowned global experts in the field of cardiovascular imaging. More than 3 200 healthcare professionals from over 90 countries are set to attend the four day event. Original research will be presented in the abstract programme and more than 150 scientific sessions will explore the hottest topics in cardiovascular imaging. Subjects of interest to the press include the use of holograms and 3D printing to guide procedures such as repair of congenital heart defects and replacement of heart valves; use of imaging for early detection and prevention of heart damage caused by cancer treatment; and foetal cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and fusion imaging to improve diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases. The main themes of the congress are imaging in heart failure and interventional imaging. Cardiac imagers have played a key role in both areas, using echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography (CT), CMR, and nuclear imaging techniques to select patients and guide procedures. These include atrial fibrillation ablation, valve replacement, and implantation of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices. Members of the press will hear the latest research in both fields. Members of the press can get a look into the future by attending sessions held in collaboration with Computers in Cardiology, a group of scientists in engineering, physics and computer science who will discuss techniques on the horizon to improve the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. Contentious issues will be debated giving media representatives both sides of the story. For example, should patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure receive revascularisation? Professor Donal said: “We don’t have convincing evidence on whether or not to treat the heart failure only. Those in favour of revascularisation argue that it improves ejection fraction and ameliorates heart failure. They will show how CMR can be used to assess viability of the myocardium and select candidates for revascularisation.” Dr Philippe Pibarot from Quebec, Canada, will give the EuroEcho-Imaging lecture “Why and how cardiac imaging has revolutionised the management of aortic stenosis”. Professor Donal said: “EuroEcho-Imaging will demonstrate how clinicians and scientists worldwide are using echocardiography, cardiac CT, CMR, and nuclear imaging to improve our understanding and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This is the event of the year for breaking news in cardiovascular imaging.”

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New cardiac imaging technique improves accuracy by removing need to breathe

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 16 maggio 2016

firenzeFlorence, Italy A new technique for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging improves accuracy by removing patients’ need to breathe, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016 by Professor Juerg Schwitter, director of the Cardiac MR Centre at the University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland.1 The lack of motion allows acquisition of higher quality images in less time.
“In many imaging techniques, but particularly in CMR, you need a relatively long acquisition time and must correct for respiratory motion,” said Professor Schwitter. “For decades we have had to correct for respiration when estimating the position and motion of the heart by CMR, and this is not always accurate.” He continued: “In Lausanne, radio-oncologists are exploring a technique called high frequency percussive ventilation. Patients do not need to breathe naturally and no correction for respiratory motion is required. This enables the physicians to more accurately plan the field of radiation to apply in each patient.” For the technique, patients put a mask over their mouth which is connected to a ventilator that delivers small volumes of air, called “percussions”. Instead of the 10 to 15 large breaths patients would take naturally per minute, air is provided in 300 to 500 small ventilations per minute. Air volumes are small so the chest does not move. The procedure is noninvasive, patients are conscious, not sedated, and do not need to breathe.For the current study, the ventilator was adapted for use in the CMR environment. CMR uses a magnet which means that metal parts had to be swapped for MR-compatible ones. Tubes were used to connect equipment inside and outside the scanning room.Professor Schwitter said: “Patients lie face up in the CMR machine and do not need to breathe. They say their chest feels a bit inflated during the ventilation but otherwise it feels okay.”The study was designed to test the feasibility and tolerability of high frequency percussive ventilation during CMR. It included one healthy volunteer aged 38 years and one patient aged 55 years with a thymic lesion. The procedure was well tolerated in both cases. The average time without breathing was ten minutes in the volunteer and six minutes in the patient.The investigators could clearly see the coronary arteries. Lung volumes were “frozen” in full inspiration and the pulmonary vessels were also seen clearly. There was no need to correct for respiratory motion.Professor Schwitter said: “We found that this type of ventilation was feasible and there was no problem with tolerating it. Of course, we are in a very early stage of development and we now need to test it in more patients. Some patients may find it difficult because the CMR machine is small and on top of that they will be ventilated by a machine.”CMR images are currently acquired in steps. Patients breathe in and then hold their breath for each image, then recover before repeating the process for the next image. High frequency percussive ventilation offers the potential to acquire all images in one go, with no need to correct for respiratory motion.
“The possibilities with high frequency percussive ventilation are huge,” said Professor Schwitter. “You could run all the CMR sequences in one batch, which would be much faster. Data could be acquired constantly with fewer artifacts. We might be able to use this technique for diagnosis of sicker patients, who find breath holding difficult and need the imaging to be done quickly.”He continued: “This technique would help us to collect high resolution images where we want millimetric precision, for example to localise scar in the myocardium or to see the anatomy of coronary arteries or valves and malformations. We would have much better conditions because we would not need to correct for motion.”Professor Schwitter concluded: “We have made promising first steps with high frequency percussive ventilation in CMR. In future we could even imagine that if the patient is not breathing for 20 minutes or even longer this technique could give a precise 3D representation of cardiac structures and help guide electrophysiology procedures such as ablation.”
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 95 000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.

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