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Quotidiano di informazione – Anno 33 n° 203

Posts Tagged ‘churchill’

‘Churchill and his Artistic Allies’

Posted by fidest press agency su venerdì, 28 maggio 2021

London – ‘Churchill and his Artistic Allies’ is an exhibition of works by Sir Winston Churchill and the three artists who were most influential in his development as a painter: Sir John Lavery, Sir William Nicholson and Walter Richard Sickert. Churchill first picked up a paintbrush in June 1915, aged 40, initially as a means of diversion and escapism from the pressures of politics, following his resignation as First Lord of the Admiralty after the unsuccessful Dardanelles campaign. Encouraged firstly by Hazel Lavery, the wife of Sir John Lavery, painting proved to be one of the greatest pleasures of Churchill’s life, a passion which he was to pursue with unyielding enthusiasm until his passing in 1965.Sir John Lavery was perhaps the most significant influence on Churchill’s painting. It was with Lavery that he began his education as an artist, painting side by side in his studio nearby. Lavery taught Churchill about the importance of light and helped him to perfect the depiction of water – using Post-Impressionistic techniques to successfully capture reflections and the dapple of light, the striking effects of which can be seen in some of Churchill’s finest works. Lavery was also first to introduce Churchill to painting in both the South of France and North Africa, in particular Morocco, where both were struck by the brilliance of light and its effect on the landscape. Both locations became of significant importance to Churchill’s painting and are today the subjects of some of his most celebrated works. The Atlas Mountains from Marrakech (circa 1949) marries together Churchill’s two great passions – painting and cigars. One of the masterpieces within his oeuvre, Churchill gifted this magnificent painting to Antonio Giraudier, a Cuban businessman who supplied him with cigars for almost 20 years. Lavery’s Played!! (1885) is a naturalistic portrayal of a young woman playing tennis, the movement of the game of tennis captured in a plein-air scene that marked a departure in Lavery’s practice. Walter Richard Sickert, who had been a childhood friend of Churchill’s wife, Clementine, became another influential figure in Churchill’s developments as a painter. They first met in 1927 and became close friends. Although their choice of subject matter was often quite different, Sickert, helped with the development of new painting techniques, including camaieu, the preparation of canvases through the under-painting of several layers, and the process of squaring up and enlarging images for transfer to larger scale canvases. The Rialto Bridge (circa 1901), a night scene in Venice of the bridge seen from the Grand Canal demonstrates the very technique that would inspire Churchill’s future paintings. The final in the trio of allies is Sir William Nicholson. Over a period of many months during 1933, Nicholson lived at Churchill’s home, Chartwell Manor. While there, he imparted to Churchill his love of the still life, his interest in and mastery with depicting contrasting surfaces, and his harmonious and carefully balanced palette, the influence of which we can see in Churchill’s work from this period onwards. Painted in 1931, Pink Cattleyas was painted on Sir William Nicholson’s trip to South Africa while he was visiting his wife’s parents, Sir Lionel and Lady Phillips. These tropical plants originated in South America, and their frilled, exotic flowers provided Nicholson with a bold yet delicate subject which evidently captured his attention. Nicholson has positioned them in a liqueur glass which sits on a moulded blue glass plate, behind which is a small glass ashtray. This simple and elegant composition, in which the small number of objects are set against an unadorned background, typifies Nicholson’s paintings of the early 1930s. This is presented alongside a still life entitled Orchids, created by Sir Winston Churchill in 1948.Chartwell Manor was characterised by the Churchill’s generosity and boundless hospitality. It was frequently full of family members, friends and Churchill’s colleagues, with luminaries, such as T.E. Lawrence, Charlie Chaplin and his three artistic allies: Sir John Lavery, Sir William Nicholson and Walter Richard Sickert amongst regular guests. Chartwell symbolised for Churchill a refuge and safe haven from the incredible pressures of his professional life, as well as representing an English Arcadia. Chartwell Landscape with Sheep (circa 1946) is one of only four known works that depicts the panoramic views from the house and grounds, with the rolling hills of Kent beyond, with the other three works remaining in the collection of the National Trust and the Churchill family.Spanning the first half of the 20th Century, the paintings in this exhibition offer an insight into the work of this group of important British artists. Tracking the influences of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism on their work, and in turn their impact on the painting of Churchill.

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Churchill’s Only Wartime Painting Sets New World Auction Record

Posted by fidest press agency su mercoledì, 3 marzo 2021

London – Christie’s Modern British Art Evening Sale on 1 March 2021 realised a new world auction record for Sir Winston Churchill’s Tower of the Koutoubia Mosque (1943, price realised: £8,285,000 / $11,590,715 / €9,577,460), which was offered from The Jolie Family Collection. The painting is the only work that Churchill created during the Second World War, executing the painting in Marrakech following the Casablanca Conference in January 1943. Churchill invited Franklin D. Roosevelt to join him in Marrakech the day after the conference concluded, motivated by his desire to share the views of the city and the light at sunset, which he so revered, with Roosevelt. The view impressed Roosevelt so much that Churchill decided to capture the scene for him as a memento of their excursion. This act was seen not only as an indication of their friendship but of the special relationship between the UK and the USA.Sir Winston Churchill began painting scenes of Morocco after being encouraged to visit the country by his painting tutor, Sir John Lavery. Upon his first visit in 1935, he felt that the light and scenery were unrivalled, creating some 45 paintings of the country.

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Sir Winston Churchill’s Only Wartime Painting to be Offered in the Modern British Art Evening Sale

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 2 febbraio 2021

London – Christie’s Modern British Art Evening Sale on 1 March 2021 will be led by Sir Winston Churchill’s Tower of the Koutoubia Mosque (1943, estimate: £1,500,000-2,500,000), which is being offered from The Jolie Family Collection. The painting is the only work that Churchill created during the Second World War, executing the painting in Marrakech following the Casablanca Conference in January 1943. Churchill invited Franklin D. Roosevelt to join him in Marrakech the day after the conference concluded, motivated by his desire to share the views of the city and the light at sunset, which he so revered, with Roosevelt. The view impressed Roosevelt so much that Churchill decided to capture the scene for him as a memento of their excursion. This act was seen not only as an indication of their friendship but of the special relationship between the UK and the USA.Nick Orchard, Head of Department, Modern British Art, Christie’s: “Christie’s is delighted to offer such a historically significant painting as the leading highlight of the Modern British Art Evening Sale. Tower of the Koutoubia Mosque was created following the Casablanca Conference where it was agreed by the Allied forces that only complete surrender by the Axis powers would be acceptable. It is the only work that Churchill painted during the war, perhaps encouraged by the recent progress made by the Allies in what he considered to be one of the most beautiful countries he had encountered. Tower of the Koutoubia Mosque is therefore arguably the best painting by Winston Churchill due to the significance of the subject matter to him, and the fact that it highlights the importance of the friendship between the two leaders. The gifting of the work to Roosevelt underlines the fact that Churchill held the American President in such high regard and points to their joint efforts in guiding the Allied powers to the outcome of the Second World War.”Sir Winston Churchill began painting scenes of Morocco after being encouraged to visit the country by his painting tutor, Sir John Lavery. Upon his first visit in 1935, he felt that the light and scenery were unrivalled, creating some 45 paintings of the country. Tower of the Koutoubia Mosque stands out as the only painting created between 1939 and 1945, and the work is expected to realise one of the top prices for Sir Winston Churchill’s paintings at auction.

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Stati Uniti d’Europa e Churchill

Posted by fidest press agency su mercoledì, 8 aprile 2020

Winston Churchill (1894-1965), è stato primo ministro del Regno Unito, nel periodo della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, dal 1940 al 1945.Celebre fu il suo discorso alla Camera dei Comuni, il 4 giugno 1940, dopo la sconfitta delle truppe anglo-francesi, assediate a Dunkerque (Francia). “Combatteremo sui mari e gli oceani, combatteremo sulle spiagge, combatteremo nei campi e nelle strade. Non ci arrenderemo mai”. Non si arresero e la guerra fu vinta.Meno noto è il discorso che tenne a Zurigo, poco dopo la fine della Seconda Guerra Mondiale. Ne riportiamo alcuni passi.”Vorrei parlarvi del dramma dell’Europa. Questo nobile continente, che comprende nel suo insieme le regioni più ricche e più favorite della Terra, gode di un clima temperato ed uniforme ed è culla di tutte le grandi etnie del mondo occidentale. Qui è l’origine di gran parte delle culture, delle arti, della filosofia e della scienza, nell’antichità come nei tempi moderni. Se un giorno l’Europa si unisse per condividere questa eredità comune, allora tre o quattrocento milioni di persone godrebbero di felicità, prosperità e gloria in misura illimitata.”Di fronte alla tragedia della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, appena trascorsa, Churchill proponeva il “rimedio” per evitare di ripetere gli errori del passato.”Qual è questo rimedio sovrano?” Si chiedeva. “Esso consiste nella ricostruzione della famiglia dei popoli europei, o in quanto più di essa possiamo ricostituire, e nel dotarla di una struttura che le permetta di vivere in pace, in sicurezza e in libertà. Dobbiamo creare una specie di Stati Uniti d’Europa.”Oggi con una crisi sanitaria in atto e una economica imminente, occorre che i Capi di Stato e di Governo, che si riuniranno la prossima settimana, abbiano a mente il discorso di Churchill fatto più di tre quarti di secolo fa.
Occorre non arrendersi, occorrono gli Stati Uniti d’Europa. Solo così vinceremo. (Primo Mastrantoni, segretario Aduc)

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