Fidest – Agenzia giornalistica/press agency

Quotidiano di informazione – Anno 33 n° 338

Posts Tagged ‘the economist’

How the pandemic will end

Posted by fidest press agency su giovedì, 21 ottobre 2021

Welcome to our weekly newsletter highlighting the best of The Economist’s coverage of the pandemic and its effects.All pandemics end eventually. Covid-19 has started down that path and will gradually become endemic. In that state, circulating and mutating from year to year, the coronavirus will remain a threat to the elderly and infirm. But having settled down, it is highly unlikely to kill on the monstrous scale of the past 20 months. In a Briefing this week, we examine how the world will eventually learn to live with covid. Though the destination is fixed, the route to endemicity is not and, in a leader, we argue that the difference between a well-planned journey and a chaotic one could be measured in millions of lives. The end of the pandemic is therefore a last chance for governments to show they have learned from the mistakes they made at its start. Meanwhile, China has decided it does not want to live with the virus. Since the early days of the pandemic, that country’s aim has been to eliminate the coronavirus entirely from within the mainland’s borders. But even as the handful of other countries with “zero-covid” policies, including Australia, New Zealand and Singapore, move to relax them, China is holding out. We ask how long China can maintain such a strict policy. The pandemic has taken a devastating toll on the physical health of millions of people but new research shows that its mental-health effects could prove even more enduring. Covid-19 has led to a sharp increase in depression and anxiety around the world. Women have fared worse than men.More than 2.1m people in Latin America and the Caribbean have died of covid-19; the death rate in the region is easily the highest in the world, according to The Economist’s excess-mortality tracker. The economic toll has also been crushing: output dropped by 7% in 2020, the steepest decline of any region. In our Americas section, we argue that Latin America’s economies now have an opportunity to grow but it would help if their governments overcame their protectionist instincts.More broadly, the IMF warns that the global economic recovery will be grossly uneven—the economic prospects of most poor countries remain far worse than those of rich ones. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

Why we’re living in a shortage economy

Posted by fidest press agency su venerdì, 15 ottobre 2021

Our cover this week focuses on what we are calling the shortage economy. For a decade after the financial crisis the world economy’s problem was a lack of spending. Worried households paid down their debts, governments imposed austerity and wary firms held back investment while hiring from a seemingly infinite pool of workers. Now spending has come roaring back, as governments have stimulated the economy and consumers let rip. The surge in demand is so powerful that supply is struggling to keep up and inflation is biting. The immediate cause of the problems is covid-19. Yet the shortage economy is also the product of the switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy and the fact that trade has become less about economic efficiency and more about goals such as labour standards and national security. Decarbonisation and protectionism will be much longer-lived than the pandemic and—for policymakers—just as hard to cope with. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The mess Merkel leaves behind

Posted by fidest press agency su mercoledì, 29 settembre 2021

We have two covers this week. In Europe we look forward to the German elections. In her 16 years in the chancellery, Angela Merkel has weathered a string of crises, from economic to pandemic. Her abilities as a consensus-forger have served her country and Europe well. But her government has neglected too much, nationally and internationally. Germany is prosperous and stable. Yet trouble is brewing. And as Mrs Merkel prepares to leave office when a new government forms after an election this weekend, admiration for her steady leadership should be mixed with frustration at the complacency she has bred. After a lacklustre campaign that has failed to grapple with Germany’s looming problems, the world should expect post-election coalition talks to last for months, poleaxing European politics while they drag on. And at the end of it all, the country may well end up with a government that fails to get much done. That is the mess Mrs Merkel has left behind.In North America and Asia, we report on the aftershocks of AUKUS, the defence deal announced last week for America and Britain to supply Australia with at least eight nuclear-powered submarines. AUKUS’s true significance is as a step towards a new balance of power in the Pacific. It is a decades-long commitment and a deep one: America and Britain are transferring some of their most sensitive technology. The three countries’ co-operation promises to embrace cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence, quantum computing and more besides. For this the Biden administration deserves credit. And yet the deal still amounts to only half a strategy. America’s relations with China involve more than a military stand-off. In the search for coexistence, America also needs to combine collaboration over issues like climate change with rules-based economic competition. The missing parts involve all of South-East Asia, home to some of the countries most vulnerable to Chinese pressure. And here American policy is struggling. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news, Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

What is the pandemic’s true death toll?

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 7 settembre 2021

Welcome to our weekly newsletter highlighting the best of The Economist’s coverage of the pandemic and its effects.Officially, covid-19 has killed around 4.5m people. But according to our own model, that is a dramatic undercount: we estimate that the actual death toll is 15.2m people, and may be as high as 18.1m.Last year, covid-19 in effect shut down the world’s economy. People stopped travelling and going to restaurants and concerts; they did not need to update their wardrobes, or buy much other than Netflix subscriptions and groceries. The Delta variant is different: it saps growth less dramatically but has fired up inflation.Partly because the virus has stopped tourism—Madagascar’s main source of hard currency—the country’s economy is shrinking dramatically, contributing to a near-famine in the country’s south. Our leader argues that in the short-term, Madagascar’s people need aid, and a lot of it; in the long-term, they need better governance. Vietnam’s economy, by contrast, has continued to grow, albeit slowly, driven by trade, foreign investment and remittances. That has helped lift its people out of poverty; whether they can become rich is less clear.Britain’s response to covid was helped by the sterling reputation of its National Health Service—the country’s strongest brand. When Islamic State set up its own health service, its logo mimicked the NHS’s sans-serif, right-leaning block capitals against a blue background.Finally, our business section ponders the future of meetings as people start returning, whether eagerly or reluctantly, to their offices. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The threat from the illiberal left

Posted by fidest press agency su domenica, 5 settembre 2021

Our cover this week warns that classical liberalism is under threat. One danger comes from the Trumpian right. The attack from the left is more surprising and harder to grasp. On the face of it illiberal progressives and classical liberals like The Economist want many of the same things. Both believe that people should be able to flourish whatever their sexuality or race. They share a suspicion of authority and entrenched interests. They believe in the desirability of change. And yet the two camps could hardly disagree more over how to make progress. Classical liberals believe that the best way to navigate disruptive change in a divided world is through a universal commitment to individual dignity, open markets and limited government. The illiberal left prefers to enforce ideological purity, by no-platforming their enemies and cancelling allies who have transgressed. The stakes could hardly be higher. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist.

Posted in Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

Welcome to our weekly newsletter highlighting the best of The Economist’s coverage of the pandemic and its effects

Posted by fidest press agency su domenica, 29 agosto 2021

This week, even more than last, chaos and misery in Afghanistan have nosed covid-19 out of the headlines. But the virus continues to spread. As Americans prepare to send their children back to school, our weekly polling with YouGov shows that most parents have either had their kids jabbed or plan to, and most back mask mandates.Early in the pandemic, Australia appeared a shining success story. By closing its borders, tracing contacts and rigidly enforcing quarantine restrictions, its “covid zero” strategy seemed to be working. (Geography helped, too: it is easier to keep a virus at bay on a remote island than in a country with long land borders.) The Delta variant has ended that strategy. As one doctor in Melbourne noted, even if contact-tracers find an infected person within 30 hours, that person’s contacts would already have passed the virus down several chains of transmission. The country is now putting its hopes in vaccines, and will allow cases to rise as long as hospitals can cope.China, where covid began, has been anxious about the World Health Organisation’s investigation into the disease’s origins. It vehemently rejects any suggestion that covid-19 escaped from a lab, but globally, infections acquired in labs are disturbingly common. China is coping with another sort of outbreak: African swine fever, which is harmless to people but is decimating the country’s immense pig population. The pandemic has sparked social and economic experimentation, as well as public-health innovations. It was long an article of faith, at least among right-leaning economists, that increasing the amount people receive from unemployment insurance (UI) would depress jobs. America’s experience during the pandemic suggests that is not true: states that restricted UI saw rises in hardship, but not employment. Adam Tooze, a historian, has written an “instant history” of the pandemic’s sizeable economic costs. And our Bartleby columnist ponders why women seem more eager than men for remote work to end and office life to resume. Zanny Minton Beddoes.Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: Highlights from the latest issue

Posted by fidest press agency su sabato, 14 agosto 2021

Our cover this week examines President Xi Jinping’s assault on China’s $4trn tech industry. Chinese regulators have mounted over 50 actions against scores of firms for a dizzying array of alleged offences, from antitrust abuses to data violations, costing investors around $1trn. Mr Xi’s immediate goal may be to humble tycoons and give regulators more sway over unruly digital markets. But the Communist Party’s deeper ambition is to redesign the industry so as to sharpen its country’s technological edge while boosting competition and benefiting consumers. In this, it echoes many of the concerns that motivate regulators and politicians in the West: that digital markets tend towards monopolies and that tech firms hoard data, abuse suppliers, exploit workers and undermine public morality. China is about to become a policy laboratory in which an unaccountable state wrestles with the world’s biggest firms for control of the 21st century’s essential infrastructure. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: A special edition on our coronavirus coverage

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 3 agosto 2021

Throughout the United States, covid-19 is spreading rapidly, mostly owing to the highly contagious Delta variant. This fourth wave of infections is strongest in the heartland and southern states: cases per 100,000 people are highest in Arkansas, Florida and Louisiana; Missouri has the highest hospitalisations.Identifying the causes of vaccine hesitancy can help policymakers decide where to target their efforts. According to surveys and modelling by The Economist, the single greatest predictor of whether an American has been vaccinated is whether they voted for Joe Biden or Donald Trump last November.In many middle-income countries around the world, from Brazil to Belarus, the pandemic is stirring unrest. People are angry about economic hardships, and they see how the rich and well-connected go to the front of the queue for vaccinations, medical treatment and government help. They are angry that their leaders have not done a better job of containing the coronavirus. At the same time, people’s suffering has created a sense of solidarity which is fanning grievances that smouldered long before anyone had heard of covid-19.In England, it looks like Boris Johnson’s gamble to unlock society will pay off. When Mr Johnson lifted restrictions on July 19th, many observers predicted disaster. More than a week of liberty later, without masks and with clubbing, cases are still falling. Indeed, daily case counts have fallen by roughly half since the rules were relaxed. Meanwhile our Bagehot columnist observes that, with the return of summer parties, a sense of normality is returning to Westminster. A strange era in British politics could be coming to a close.Among the many emergency measures introduced by state governments in America during the pandemic, one stood out for the jollity it heralded: a change in the law to allow bars and restaurants to sell cocktails-to-go. The change in states’ alcohol laws looks set to stay. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: In a 3°C world, there is no safe place

Posted by fidest press agency su domenica, 25 luglio 2021

The ground under the German town of Erftstadt is torn apart like tissue paper by flood waters; Lytton in British Columbia is burned from the map just a day after setting a freakishly high temperature record; cars float like dead fish through the streets-turned-canals in the Chinese city of Zhengzhou. All the world feels at risk, and most of it is. Six years ago, in Paris, the countries of the world committed themselves to avoiding the worst of climate change by eliminating net greenhouse-gas emissions quickly enough to hold the temperature rise below 2°C. Their progress towards that end remains woefully inadequate. But even if their efforts increased dramatically enough to meet the 2°C goal, it would not stop forests from burning today; prairies would still dry out tomorrow, rivers break their banks and mountain glaciers disappear. And even if everyone manages to honour their pledges, there is still a risk that temperatures could eventually rise by 3°C above pre-industrial levels. Our cover this week explores what that means for the climate and for climate policy. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: Biden’s China doctrine

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 19 luglio 2021

Our cover this week is about President Joe Biden’s China doctrine. Between them, Mr Biden and Donald Trump have engineered the most dramatic break in American foreign policy in the five decades since Richard Nixon went to China. Optimists long hoped that welcoming China into the global economy would make it a “responsible stakeholder”, and perhaps bring about political reform. Today Mr Biden foresees a struggle that pits America against China—a struggle that he says can have only one winner. The administration believes that America must blunt China’s ambitions, by building up its strength at home and working with allies abroad. Much about Mr Biden’s new doctrine makes sense, but the details contain a lot to be worried about—not least the fact that it is unlikely to work. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news, Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week

Posted by fidest press agency su giovedì, 15 luglio 2021

A special edition on our coronavirus coverage.A poll for The Economist shows that people in Britain seem to support lockdowns. Two-thirds think masks, social distancing and travel restrictions should continue for another month after July 19th, dubbed by some as “freedom day” because that is the date after which nearly all the remaining anti-covid measures in England will be lifted. A majority of Britons, however, would support the continuation of restrictions until covid-19 is controlled worldwide, which may take years.Russia is in the midst of its third and most severe wave of covid-19, with more people dying daily than at any other point in the pandemic. This is in spite of the fact that the country registered the world’s first coronavirus vaccine. Mixed messages and mistrust of the government are to blame, as we hear on our daily podcast, “The Intelligence”.In the Business section, we look at which airlines will soar after the pandemic. An uneven recovery will boost big carriers in America and China, and cheap and cheerful ones in Europe.Jair Bolsanaro, Brazil’s president, finds himself in the spotlight because of murky procurement negotiations for two covid-19 vaccines in the country.Meanwhile our data journalists have been busy examining the impacts of covid-19. In one study they found that in-person voting in November’s elections in America really did accelerate covid-19’s spread in the country. In a separate study, economists found that labour markets in the rich world are recovering from covid-19—but low-paid workers and the young may continue to struggle. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist We have two covers this week

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 6 luglio 2021

In most of our editions we highlight our new normalcy index. Taking the pre-pandemic average as 100, it tracks such things as flights, traffic and retailing across dozens of countries comprising 76% of the Earth’s population. Today it stands at 66—double the level in 2020, but still well below the pre-pandemic benchmark. One reason for this is that covid-19 is still ravaging many countries, as a lack of vaccines leaves them open to highly infectious new variants. But even vaccinated countries such as America remain far from normal. And that may be because it is becoming clear that the new normal will be profoundly different from the old one. In our American edition we write about the battle to defend American democracy. Democrats believe that the threat to elections centres on who is able to vote. The greater worry is what happens after votes have been cast. Across America, Republican state legislatures have come under pressure from Donald Trump and his allies, who continue to insist that Joe Biden did not really win the presidential election. As a result, they are passing laws that will turn vote-counting into a partisan battleground. This raises the spectre of a contested election that the courts are unable to resolve. Long after the hysteria over the 2020 election has abated, America’s voting system will bear the scars. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist.

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: A special edition on our coronavirus coverage

Posted by fidest press agency su mercoledì, 9 giugno 2021

Welcome to our weekly newsletter highlighting the best of The Economist’s coverage of the pandemic and its effects. At last Europe’s vaccination campaign has gathered pace, with supply bottlenecks starting to ease. Eastern Europe, however, still lags behind. In Britain, Boris Johnson has said he is “absolutely determined” that no school child should be held back because of the educational disruptions caused by covid-19. However, this week his “education-recovery commissioner” resigned because of a lack of ministerial determination. Sir Kevan Collins, a widely-respected former teacher, was trying to convince the government to support a package of measures costing around £15bn ($20bn) over three years. He stepped down hours after it was announced that the government’s proposed budget for school catch-up programmes would be around £3bn ($4.2bn). In the United States, new research suggests that Hispanic Americans are most vulnerable to covid-19. Researchers still do not understand why.In its latest Economic Outlook, the OECD argues that economies are likely to diverge, as some (America and China) recover from the pandemic faster than others (many poor countries). Covid-19 has also struck different sectors differently: tech and pharmaceutical firms prospered; transport and energy firms suffered. Our data journalists find that covid-19 deaths in Wuhan seem far higher than the official count. Partial data suggest that the city’s initial outbreak may have been two or three times worse than reported by Chinese officials.On “The Jab”, our podcast reporting from the sharp end of the vaccination race, we look at how scientists are trying to understand the best way to administer jabs. Can mixing vaccine types boost immunity to the coronavirus? What is the best interval between doses? And should children be jabbed? Airborne transmission is one of the main ways in which the SARS-CoV-2 virus spreads—so why has it taken so long to be officially recognised? We investigate on our science podcast, “Babbage”.In our sister magazine, 1843, Shreevatsa Nevatia writes that covid-19 has exposed the great fiction of middle-class life in India: domestic staff are part of the family. Now he sees that that was a lie. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Uncategorized | Contrassegnato da tag: , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist this week: Highlights from the latest issue

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 25 Maggio 2021

Our cover this week is about race in America a year after the murder of George Floyd. Mr Floyd’s death prompted the biggest civil-rights protests in American history. The policeman who killed him was, unusually, convicted of murder. And institutions in America and beyond looked at themselves in a different light. Something needed to change. But what exactly? Most racial disparities in America come about when three things collide: secular economic trends; the aftershocks of slavery and segregation; and present-day bigotry and racism. The first two are usually the biggest causes of bad outcomes for African-Americans, but the third—racism today—gets most of the attention. This is backwards. Racism remains a curse, though it is less widespread than 30 years ago, let alone in the civil-rights era. But, since it is lodged in bigoted minds, rooting it out is largely beyond the power of any government. Poverty and the structural legacy of racism in institutions are different. Take the Biden administration’s new child tax credit, which looks likely to reduce child poverty by 40%. Because African-Americans are disproportionately poor, this race-neutral policy should halve the number of poor black children. Our leader argues that this approach is not just popular and effective, it is also right. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist: A special edition on our coronavirus coverage

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 25 Maggio 2021

This week we look forward to the Olympics, due to start in Japan in July. As their country endures a wave of infections, 60% of Japanese tell pollsters that they would sooner not host the games at all. One of the worries is that athletes arriving from across the world could help spread dangerous new variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid-19. A cautionary tale is unfolding in Britain, which sequences the genes of circulating viruses more assiduously than any other country. B.1.1.7, the variant first identified in Kent, is being displaced by a variant from India, B.1.617.2, especially in Bolton—where a community with ties to the Indian subcontinent also happens to have taken up vaccines less readily than the national average.Levels of protection are also a worry in America, where the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention have issued advice that vaccinated Americans no longer need to wear a mask in most situations. Only 38% of Americans are fully vaccinated. Given that the threshold for herd immunity could be 70-80%, that leaves plenty of scope for further spread of the virus.New Zealand and Australia face an entirely different problem. Having successfully followed zero-covid strategies they have imposed semi-permanent restrictions on foreign visitors, who risk bringing the virus in with them. As the pandemic eases in some countries, economic activity is partly returning to something closer to normal. Our data team reports that shoppers are going gangbusters. But as recovery creates jobs in industries that have been locked down, there seems to be a severe shortage of workers to fill them. What has gone wrong? Our economics staff investigate this conundrum.On Economist Radio we have been expanding on our work to show the real death toll from covid-19—which we released last week. Officially a little over 3.4m people have died, but we have designed a statistical model that estimates how many people went uncounted—and reached a central estimate of 10m. Our weekly podcast on vaccination, “The Jab”, discusses what we found and its significance, and “The Intelligence”, our daily news podcast, contains a segment on how to vaccinate the world.Finally, getting oxygen into people with covid-19 has been a problem throughout the pandemic. Ventilators have been in short supply. And the intubation of patients has caused them harm. Our science section reports on an alternative—oxygen enemas. It sounds mad—and painful—but it really could work. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist: A special edition on our coronavirus coverage

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 26 aprile 2021

Our cover in Asia tells the grim story of covid-19 in India, which is struggling with a catastrophic second wave. Until March, India was recording barely 13,000 new covid-19 cases a day, fewer than Germany or France and a drop in the ocean for a nation of 1.4bn. By late last month, however, it was rocketing. On April 21st India clocked 315,000 new positive tests, above even the biggest daily rise recorded in America, the only other country to report such highs. A return of the virus was inevitable, but the government’s distraction and complacency have amplified the surge. (We also cover the story in our daily podcast, “The Intelligence”).In the Netherlands, the state is funding pilot programmes to explore whether rapid testing of patrons for covid-19 can allow reopening of restaurants, museums, cultural events and the like. The budget is huge: €1.1bn ($1.3bn) through August, more than 0.1% of GDP. But critics say the experiments are so flawed that they may prove useless. In Africa, vaccination is off to a slow start. Just 6m doses have been administered in sub-Saharan Africa, fewer than in New Jersey. Just 1% of African adults have received a first jab, versus a global average of 13%. Scant supply is the biggest problem, but not the only one.Meanwhile, Latin American athletes are jumping the queue for vaccines: on April 13th Lionel Messi helped to score 50,000 vaccines for Conmebol, the South American football confederation, after sending three signed shirts to Sinovac, a Chinese pharmaceutical company. American export controls on raw materials and equipment threaten to hinder global vaccine production. Production lines in India, turning out at least 160m doses of covid vaccine a month, will soon grind to a halt unless America supplies 37 critical items.Our “Free exchange” columnist considers how to think about vaccines and patents during a pandemic—do public-health crises call for a departure from the rules? We explore the issue further in a pair of “By Invitation” articles, in which economists and business leaders make their arguments for and against suspending intellectual property rights on medical products related to covid-19.On “The Jab”, our podcast reporting from the sharp end of the vaccination race, we turn our attention to Europe. The continent is suffering a third wave of covid-19 after the European Commission’s vaccine roll-out stalled. France’s president, Emmanuel Macron, has said Europe “lacked ambition” in its vaccine efforts. How can European countries catch up?Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist: Vladimir Putin’s next move

Posted by fidest press agency su sabato, 24 aprile 2021

We have two covers this week. In most of the world we report on Vladimir Putin’s next move. His main domestic opponent, Alexei Navalny, is in prison, on hunger strike and in danger of dying. Living standards in Russia are sliding, and with them support for Mr Putin’s party. Mr Navalny’s videos exposing corruption at the top, and offering a guided tour of a gaudy palace that Mr Putin denies owning, have struck a chord. To distract public attention and fire up patriotic voters, Mr Putin is once again menacing his neighbours. In recent weeks he has massed more than 100,000 Russian troops on the border with Ukraine, a country he has already partly dismembered. Then, on April 22nd, his defence minister said they were pulling back again. Whether they will all pull back remains unclear. Also unclear is whether this massive show of force was just for show, or to intimidate Ukraine into making more concessions. President Joe Biden faces a test. America and its allies must find ways to deter Mr Putin from aggression abroad and oppression at home. It will not be easy, for Russia has built a siege economy, stagnant but unusually resistant to sanctions. Fortunately, unlike his predecessor, Mr Biden has no illusions about the strongman in the Kremlin. Our cover in Asia describes India’s alarming second wave of covid-19. On April 21st the country recorded 315,000 new infections in a single day—the highest tally of any country at any point in the pandemic. Experts suspect that even this is a massive undercount. Makeshift pyres are being erected on pavements outside crematoriums to deal with the influx of bodies. The government of Narendra Modi grew complacent after India’s earlier, milder wave. Instead of focusing on public health, it has poured its energies into partisan politics, holding huge and largely maskless campaign rallies in West Bengal. Although India is a big vaccine-maker, it has failed to secure enough doses, and production is now threatened by American export controls on vital kit. The government should adopt strict curbs on large gatherings, even religious ones, and scramble to help vaccine-makers ramp up their output. Unless India’s covid surge is brought under control, the entire world will suffer. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist.

Posted in Estero/world news, Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist’s best coverage of the pandemic and its effects

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 20 aprile 2021

Johnson & Johnson’s covid-19 vaccine is the latest to suffer a setback. On April 13th American health authorities paused its use to investigate six cases of unusual blood clots in people who had received the jab, after more than 6m doses were administered. European countries halted the jab too. The jury is still out on whether these blood clots are linked to the Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine but the same rare condition was linked to AstraZeneca’s covid-19 vaccine a week earlier, which suggests that could be the case. Both jabs use a modified adenovirus, though a different one is involved in each.On “The Jab”, our podcast reporting from the sharp end of the vaccination race, we investigate vaccine hesitancy in America. The country is close to delivering jabs to almost all who want them—unfortunately, only seven in ten Americans are interested. In the United States section, we focus on white evangelicals, a community that seems particularly set against the idea of taking covid jabs, and consider the kinds of messaging might be used to persuade the sceptics.Vermont, America’s second-whitest state (after Maine) has made all non-white residents, and those in their households, eligible for the vaccine. The move has raised some legal concerns, but proponents defend it on public-health grounds, since non-white Americans have suffered disproportionately from covid-19. The vaccine roll-out in Hong Kong has become highly politicised. China is pressing Hong Kongers to accept a Chinese vaccine, but many there would prefer a better one. In the Graphic detail section, we delve into the latest clinical and real world trial results for China’s CoronaVac vaccine, developed by Sinovac Biotech. The numbers show that the vaccine underperforms, with efficacy rates that range from 83% to a little over 50%. Not as impressive as the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, which cut the risk of catching covid-19 by more than 90%. On our science podcast, “Babbage”, we investigate one of the covid-19 pandemic’s most compelling mysteries—where did SARS-CoV-2 virus come from? By Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief font: The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news | Contrassegnato da tag: , , , | Leave a Comment »

From United Kingdom to Untied Kingdom

Posted by fidest press agency su domenica, 18 aprile 2021

The Economist this week.The Economist is a global newspaper, but occasionally we have stories that have special relevance for their region—and then we shuffle the order of our leaders, to bring different editorials to the cover slot in different editions. This is one of those rare weeks when we have no fewer than three covers. In Britain and Europe we look at how the bonds that hold the United Kingdom together are fraying. The union is now weaker than at any point in living memory. The causes are many, but Brexit is the most important. Political leaders in London, Edinburgh and Belfast have put their country at risk by the way they have managed Britain’s departure from the European Union. Boris Johnson, the prime minister, has done it carelessly, by putting party above country and espousing a hard Brexit. Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister and leader of the Scottish National Party, has done it determinedly, by exploiting Scots’ dislike of the Brexit settlement. Arlene Foster, first minister of Northern Ireland and head of the Democratic Unionist Party has done it stupidly, by rejecting the softer Brexit proposed by Theresa May, Mr Johnson’s pre­decessor. If the Scots, Northern Irish or even the Welsh choose to go their own way, they should be allowed to do so—but only once it is clearly their settled will. That is by no means the case yet, and this newspaper hopes it never will be. In North America we report on the era of the political CEO. Business and politics are growing closer in America, with worrying consequences. Sometimes this is in pursuit of honourable causes, as in the protest of chief executives over new laws restricting voting in Georgia and other states. Sometimes it is visible in the statesman-CEO: the latest manifesto from Jamie Dimon, boss of JPMorgan Chase, pronounces on military procurement and criminal justice among many other weighty concerns. Most broadly of all, it is reflected in how the Business Roundtable, a lobbying group, has extended the corporate remit to include all stakeholders, for the success of firms, communities and the country. At The Economist we strongly support the protection of voting rights. We believe that companies operating in competitive markets advance social progress. Nonetheless, as classical liberals, we also believe that concentrations of power are dangerous. Businesspeople will always lobby for their own advantage and the closer they get to the government, the more harm they threaten to both the economy and politics. And in Asia we warn that Myanmar could become Asia’s next failed state. Daily protests continue and soldiers are rampaging through rebellious districts, beating and killing at random; the overall death toll has passed 700. Citizens have burned down shops tied to the army and a general strike has paralysed businesses and public services. In the borderlands some of the 20 or so armed groups that have battled the government on-and-off for decades are taking advantage of the crisis to seize military outposts or caches of weapons. A vacuum is being created in a territory bigger than France that abuts Asia’s biggest powers, China and India. It will be filled by violence and suffering. Although Myanmar is not yet as lawless as Afghanistan, it is rapidly heading in that direction. The ruin of Myanmar is not only a calamity for the 54m Burmese; it also threatens to spread chaos as drugs, disease and refugees spill over Myanmar’s borders. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news, Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , | Leave a Comment »

The Economist: Our coverage of the coronavirus

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 15 marzo 2021

A year ago this week the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the covid-19 outbreak to be a pandemic. Our data team has been closely following the course of the disease and its toll from the start, producing a range of trackers and interactive charts to keep us informed about how covid-19 has spread, how many people have died (and where) and how well vaccination programmes are faring worldwide. This week the team launched its latest and most ambitious project—the covid mortality risk estimator. Though covid-19 threatens everyone, its highest risks are concentrated among particular groups of people. For any group of unvaccinated people of a given age, sex and mix of other illnesses, the data team’s new tool can estimate the proportion that will be hospitalised or die within 30 days of a covid-19 diagnosis. You can interact with the data here.In the Asia section, we look at a conundrum in India: the country seems to have suffered surprisingly few deaths from covid-19. What explains its apparent success?It is well-established that, among rich nations, Europe is a laggard in its vaccination roll-out. A protracted swell of cases is highlighting the continent’s problems.In the Science and technology section, we look at the potential for vaccine passports to start getting life back on track in countries where jabs have become widespread. Though identity schemes such as vaccine passports do have a part to play in the return to life as normal, we argue it will be only modest.On the first anniversary of the WHO’s declaration of a pandemic, our “Babbage” podcast looks at the lessons the world has learned. And on “The Jab”, we discuss how clinical trials for vaccines work and give you a guide on how to interpret the numbers flowing out of them. Zanny Minton Beddoes Editor-In-Chief The Economist

Posted in Estero/world news, Recensioni/Reviews | Contrassegnato da tag: , , | Leave a Comment »