Fidest – Agenzia giornalistica/press agency

Quotidiano di informazione – Anno 33 n° 244

Posts Tagged ‘world day’

World Day of the Poor message 2020

Posted by fidest press agency su lunedì, 16 novembre 2020

By Msgr Pierre Cibambo, Caritas Internationalis ecclesiastical advisor. The message this year is: “Stretch forth your hand to the poor” (Sir 7:32).” This is an appropriate call for all of us in a year when many of us have closed ourselves away from the world to protect ourselves from the coronavirus pandemic. In spite of the enormous global challenges of 2020, Caritas has shown that love does not go on lockdown and close itself away from the poor and vulnerable at their time of great need. The mission of Caritas to listen and accompany is powered forward by our many volunteers and staff who give themselves selflessly to building a better world. Our Popes have reminded us that “Caritas is at the heart of the Church” and the World Day of the Poor is a moment to remember and deepen our dedication to placing the poor at the centre, to raising them up and to ensuring their voices are heard. Our mission is to “ensure that people living in poverty are active participants in building an inclusive and equitable society, a transformative Caritas and a welcoming Church.” But what does this mean for each and every one of us as part of the Caritas family? The answers are not always easy, but require an attitude which embodies humble listening and solidarity. Let us not forget that this special day in honour of our brothers and sisters in need is named “World Day OF the Poor” and not “World Day FOR the Poor”. We are not only sharing part of our wealth with the poor, we are also receiving something from them. In a true Christian community, there are no members who are just giving, and others who are just receiving. There are only neighbours who share because in Christ we are all one. The hand we outstretch to the poor, is not only a hand that distributes but also a hand in need. We need the poor as much as they need us. They challenge us to become increasingly truer witnesses of Christ. When we encounter the poor, listen to them and accompany them, it is they who evangelise us. The poor invite us to open our hearts and to transform our narrow, worldly view to see Christ in their presence here on earth.“We are called to find Christ in them, to lend our voice to their causes, but also to be their friends, to listen to them, to speak for them and to embrace the mysterious wisdom which God wishes to share with us through them.” Evangelii Gaudium. Caritas Internationalis president, Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, has said, “The big lesson of my life as a pastor has been to go towards the poor, not bearing words, but with a heart ready to listen to and learn from them. Before saying even one single word, it’s important to understand the person who is in front of you. By respectfully listening to the poor, you affirm their dignity.” As the World Day of the Poor approaches, wherever possible and appropriate, we invite you all to take action to prepare for the celebration of this day.We encourage you, friends around the world, to reflect on what we have learnt from the poor on a personal and community level and ensure they are at the centre of our thoughts and actions on that day.A hand held out is a sign; a sign that immediately speaks of closeness, solidarity and love. On the World Day of the Poor, together, we will reach out our hands as one human family in global solidarity to build inclusive and equitable societies and a transformative and welcoming Church.

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53rd Message for the World Day of Peace by Pope Francis

Posted by fidest press agency su martedì, 17 dicembre 2019

Will be celebrated on January the 1st, 2020. As every year, The Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development encourages all Episcopal Conferences, Dioceses, Religious Institutes, Ecclesial Associations and Movements, and all people of good will to organise a prayer meeting in particular Churches to celebrate the World Day of Peace 2020. Peace is a great and precious value, the object of our hope and the aspiration of the entire human family. As a human attitude, our hope for peace is marked by an existential tension that makes it possible for the present, with all its difficulties, to be “lived and accepted if it leads towards a goal, if we can be sure of this goal, and if this goal is great enough to justify the effort of the journey”. Hope is thus the virtue that inspires us and keeps us moving forward, even when obstacles seem insurmountable.
As I observed during my recent Apostolic Journey to Japan, our world is paradoxically marked by “a perverse dichotomy that tries to defend and ensure stability and peace through a false sense of security sustained by a mentality of fear and mistrust, one that ends up poisoning relationships between peoples and obstructing any form of dialogue. Peace and international stability are incompatible with attempts to build upon the fear of mutual destruction or the threat of total annihilation. They can be achieved only on the basis of a global ethic of solidarity and cooperation in the service of a future shaped by interdependence and shared responsibility in the whole human family of today and tomorrow”.
We cannot claim to maintain stability in the world through the fear of annihilation, in a volatile situation, suspended on the brink of a nuclear abyss and enclosed behind walls of indifference. As a result, social and economic decisions are being made that lead to tragic situations where human beings and creation itself are discarded rather than protected and preserved. How, then, do we undertake a journey of peace and mutual respect? How do we break the unhealthy mentality of threats and fear? How do we break the current dynamic of distrust?
The Hibakusha, the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, are among those who currently keep alive the flame of collective conscience, bearing witness to succeeding generations to the horror of what happened in August 1945 and the unspeakable sufferings that have continued to the present time. Their testimony awakens and preserves the memory of the victims, so that the conscience of humanity may rise up in the face of every desire for dominance and destruction. “We cannot allow present and future generations to lose the memory of what happened here. It is a memory that ensures and encourages the building of a more fair and fraternal future”.
The world does not need empty words but convinced witnesses, peacemakers who are open to a dialogue that rejects exclusion or manipulation. In fact, we cannot truly achieve peace without a convinced dialogue between men and women who seek the truth beyond ideologies and differing opinions. Peace “must be built up continually”; it is a journey made together in constant pursuit of the common good, truthfulness and respect for law. Listening to one another can lead to mutual understanding and esteem, and even to seeing in an enemy the face of a brother or sister.As Saint Paul VI pointed out, these “two aspirations, to equality and to participation, seek to promote a democratic society… This calls for an education to social life, involving not only the knowledge of each person’s rights, but also its necessary correlative: the recognition of his or her duties with regard to others. The sense and practice of duty are themselves conditioned by the capacity for self-mastery and by the acceptance of responsibility and of the limits placed upon the freedom of individuals or the groups”.Divisions within a society, the increase of social inequalities and the refusal to employ the means of ensuring integral human development endanger the pursuit of the common good. Yet patient efforts based on the power of the word and of truth can help foster a greater capacity for compassion and creative solidarity.In our Christian experience, we constantly remember Christ, who gave his life to reconcile us to one another (cf. Rom 5:6-11). The Church shares fully in the search for a just social order; she continues to serve the common good and to nourish the hope for peace by transmitting Christian values and moral teaching, and by her social and educational works.The Bible, especially in the words of the Prophets, reminds individuals and peoples of God’s covenant with humanity, which entails renouncing our desire to dominate others and learning to see one another as persons, sons and daughters of God, brothers and sisters. We should never encapsulate others in what they may have said or done, but value them for the promise that they embody. Only by choosing the path of respect can we break the spiral of vengeance and set out on the journey of hope.Faced with the consequences of our hostility towards others, our lack of respect for our common home or our abusive exploitation of natural resources – seen only as a source of immediate profit, regardless of local communities, the common good and nature itself – we are in need of an ecological conversion. The recent Synod on the Pan-Amazon Region moves us to make a pressing renewed call for a peaceful relationship between communities and the land, between present and past, between experience and hope.
This journey of reconciliation also calls for listening and contemplation of the world that God has given us as a gift to make our common home. Indeed, natural resources, the many forms of life and the earth itself have been entrusted to us “to till and keep” (Gen 1:15), also for future generations, through the responsible and active participation of everyone. We need to change the way we think and see things, and to become more open to encountering others and accepting the gift of creation, which reflects the beauty and wisdom of its Creator.The journey of reconciliation calls for patience and trust. Peace will not be obtained unless it is hoped for.In the first place, this means believing in the possibility of peace, believing that others need peace just as much as we do. Here we can find inspiration in the love that God has for each of us: a love that is liberating, limitless, gratuitous and tireless.The grace of God our Father is bestowed as unconditional love. Having received his forgiveness in Christ, we can set out to offer that peace to the men and women of our time. Day by day, the Holy Spirit prompts in us ways of thinking and speaking that can make us artisans of justice and peace.May the God of peace bless us and come to our aid.May Mary, Mother of the Prince of Peace and Mother of all the peoples of the earth, accompany and sustain us at every step of our journey of reconciliation.And may all men and women who come into this world experience a life of peace and develop fully the promise of life and love dwelling in their heart. (abstract)

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